I Know That I Am Still Black. But Am I Still Catholic? 16 comments


I wrote a very revealing post almost 2 years ago called Should I Tell My Readers That I’m A Black Catholic Convert Who Votes Democrat? When I first started blogging in January 2013, I was in a weird space about what I should share and what I shouldn’t. So I chose to put it all out there and the response was very favorable. A lot has happened since that time, so this is my Rewind: Repost and I am spilling my guts once again.

 

I Know I Am Still Black But Am I Still Catholic by Being Wordsmith

 

In that post, I also shared a comment that I wrote on Kate at Another Clean Slate‘s site. It refers to my upbringing in the Baptist church and my eventual conversion to Catholicism as an adult. Here it is again…

 

 

I still stand by everything I said in the above comment. However, in the past few months, Hubby started attending a non-denominational church regularly. He never wanted to pressure me into “making a choice”, so he simply got The Deuce ready on Sundays and they went together. I could tell without him ever saying anything that Hubby was enjoying this new church.

 

The congregation is small, the Pastor is my age, everyone wears casual clothing, and the service lasts an hour.

 

I attended the service with him one Sunday and was quite impressed. Not because it was a large building with a fancy interior and a big congregation. But because it was NOT. The congregation is small, the Pastor is my age, everyone wears casual clothing, and the service lasts an hour. The Deuce and other children his age and younger are given bible lessons in another area of the church.

 

Non-denominational is somewhere in the middle, right? But where?

 

Because I enjoyed the service so much the first time, I began going regularly. I thought it was important that The Deuce experience us going to church as a family. I didn’t take communion at first because I have only ever done so in a Baptist or Catholic church. I was baptized as a child in the Baptist faith and as an adult went to Catechism classes for 9 months to be Catholic. I struggled with how to embrace a new way of practicing Christianity. Non-denominational is somewhere in the middle, right? But where?

 

My younger sister, April is a strong Christian who attends a non-denominational church. I shared my dilemma with her and she put everything into perspective for me. She told me that I was not turning my back on either faith. And that God doesn’t care how I come to Him as long as I do. Thank you, April. It was all I needed to hear. Hubby, The Deuce, and I now have a new church home. 

 

How much do you reveal about yourself in your blogging?

Have you ever received negative feedback for sharing certain things on your blog?

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Rewind: Repost is a monthly feature on Being A Wordsmith that gives an update on previous posts.

 


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16 thoughts on “I Know That I Am Still Black. But Am I Still Catholic?

  • Carolina Twin Mom / Mary Peterson

    Thank you for the post! I really like how your family treats religion and spirituality as an individual decision and not a family one. Not every family member may want the same thing out of their church experience and the most important thing is to foster a relationship with God, however that comes about.

  • Mari

    Hummmmmm Great share. I was raised Catholic per say and even went to Catholic school up till 8th grade but I can’t say I identify with one specific religion. I am more spiritual than anything else. I believe in a higher power and I believe we are all connected as humans. Labels to me are what keep us separated and building trouble. I love though to learn from everyone’s experience and perspective. Nice read 🙂 xo

  • Mrs. AOK

    Thanks for sharing your post with us at Mommy Monday.
    I think it’s hard to share intimate information on such a large scale. I have personally opened up a little more over the last year or so, but I still keep things quite private- I think.
    XOXO

    • beingawordsmith Post author

      It is difficult to share some things. I am always amazed at the deeper info that some bloggers share about their marriage, kids, abuse, etc. Privacy is good too. Thank you!

  • Patrick Weseman

    I am black and have been a Catholic all my life. I was confirmed in the church about 30 years ago.I found a great Catholic church that is very interracial and celebrates everybody.

    The problem around here is that there are a lot of Catholic churches but the masses are usually designed for one ethnic group at a time. It causes a lot of division.

    Also remember that “Faith is a house with many rooms.”

    http://csuhpat1.blogspot.com/2015/06/bay-area-book-festival.html

  • Maria@SewTravelInspired

    A very thought-provoking post. My mother is so Catholic that we refer to her as “the Pope.” Not where she can hear us though. My faith is very important to me but it has always been private. It is only lately that I have been sharing.

  • Kenya G. Johnson

    I love your sisters answer. We go to a non-denominational church as well. I loved it first for its diversity. Especially with the news as it is today, I feel like our races are growing apart – not together. But going to our church is where I truly feel no differently from anyone else. I got deep a couple of posts ago and it was well received as well. I can’t imagine someone in our blogging community speaking negatively in the comments. I think if they didn’t agree they just wouldn’t comment. It hasn’t happened to me yet and I haven’t submitted anything to a broader audience to know what it feels like. As far as personal stuff they only thing I don’t talk about is my marriage. Unless we’re actually Facebook friends no one knows my husband’s name. I’ve talked about him in fun and satire but nothing that would embarrass him in anyway.

    • beingawordsmith Post author

      Thanks, girl! It was a struggle at first, but my sister made it all clear for me.